Conservation

Thai street artist supports Greenpeace rainforest campaign

Art really can change the world. Take the renowned Thai street artist Mue Bon, who is collaborating with Greenpeace in an attempt to stop Indonesian rainforests being cleared and destroyed to create palm oil plantations. His new mural, made especially, is an artwork called Wings of Paradise, featuring a bird of paradise, and you can see it on the walls of the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre, on display until 14th October.

About Mue Bon – Thoughtful and talented

Mue Bon is a highly respected Bangkok-based artist. He creates paintings and installations using mixed media and started his artistic career at a time when street art had a low profile in his homeland. Part of the early Thai street artist revolution, Mue Bon's work embellishes the streets, and he's determined to carry on improving the reputation of street artists in Thailand by making their work more accessible to the public.

He's just one of many artists lending their skills to help campaign for rainforest conservation. The campaign also involves collaboration with artists from as far away as Australia and Kuala Lumpur. And the message is crystal clear: we need to protect and save Indonesia's rainforests.

The palm oil industry – dirty, greedy and cruel

The palm oil industry, in the meantime, steamrollers on without so much as a thought for the future. It has already ravaged the precious forests of Borneo and Sumatra, and now it has finally reached Papua, where the bird of paradise depicted by Mue Bon lives. According to Greenpeace the mysterious, little-known birds and the forest they live in are under serious threat. As Mue Bon said in The Nation (http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/event/30355700), “Forests, home to endangered animals and precious treasures from the earth, are being destroyed by the hands of humans. I hope this artwork will be able to reflect the voices of these animals, voices that otherwise might never reach the concrete jungle.”

When business and street art collaborate…

These days business is finally starting to realise the commercial potential of street art collaborations in Thailand. The artwork attracts tourists and reflects well on brands. In effect the businesses become art curators, which gives them an essential sense of ownership and spreads the message far and wide. In a world where large tracts of rainforest are being felled daily, every effort we can make to stop the destruction matters. Thank you, Mue Bon.

We'll leave the last word to Greenpeace. “It’s time for us to stand together for the future of Indonesian forests. Artists, students, bird enthusiasts or consumers buying palm oil products in supermarkets, we need to come together and act.”

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - October 8, 2018 at 2:48 pm

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

£9 million boost set to protect Wales’ magical Celtic rainforest

Vast areas of forest once covered the land between northern Scotland and Portugal. All that's left in Britain is the Celtic rainforest in Wales. The words ‘rainforest' and ‘Wales' don't seem, at first glance, a logical fit. But they are, thanks to this stunningly lovely and seriously endangered rainforest. Now the ancient woodlands have received a boost in the form of £9M funding from the Welsh government and the EU.

Why Wales' rainforests matter

These forests are some of the most valuable landscapes in terms of wildlife and culture. Woodlands are a valued natural asset in Wales, vital for the environment. They protect the land against floods, generate beautifully clean, fresh air, and give shelter to livestock. The project will improve the condition of key woodlands in Wales significantly, and that in turn will help the UK meet its European and international

biodiversity targets.

How the money will be spent

The funds are going to be spent on protecting and improving the wet and temperate forest, which is full of sessile oak, downy birch, ash and hazel. A precious British rainforest, it has deteriorated thanks to conifer plantations, invasive Rhododendron, sheep and deer. The damage caused has put rare flora and fauna under more stress than ever. Lichens, tree lungwort and birds are at risk, as well as the rare lesser horseshoe bat, otter and dormouse.

At the same times these incredibly biodiverse oak woodlands are the stars of the show in many a Welsh folk tale and song, which adds an important social and cultural element to their protection. They are special, mysterious places celebrated and enjoyed by thousands, and with a bit of luck they'll be around to inspire future generations.

Hopefully four key areas of Celtic rainforest will be cleared of of invasive species, in north and mid-Wales, including north Wales' Coed Felinrhyd and Llennyrch, both in Snowdonia. The people involved will also be looking for more ways to improve the forests' management, things like altering the way the land is grazed, and some of the money will  be used to generate interest and bring more visitors.

Brexit won't affect the funding

Happily, leaving the EU won't affect the funding, a good piece of news that has been officially confirmed by Welsh and English governments.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - September 30, 2018 at 6:18 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

How ancient farming communities made the Amazon what it is today

It looks like the Amazon rainforest we know and love today isn't pure and pristine at all. Research by the University of Exeter has revealed how it is far from untouched, thanks to ancient farmers who transformed the region in dramatic ways. Apparently the farmers introduced crops to new areas, boosted the number of tree species that generated food, and even used fires to improve the soil.

The study was undertaken by archaeologists, palaeoecologists, botanists and ecologists, and reveals the way early Amazon residents farmed intensively without having to continually clear fresh areas of woodland. They made their discoveries by analysing charcoal, pollen, plant remains and lake sediments.

Ancient people were wiser than us – They knew how to farm without ruining the soil

The forest's ancient residents grew maize, sweet potato, manioc and squash, and the remains date back an impressive 4,500 years. They apparently improved the soil by burning vegetation, adding manure and digging in waste food, and as well as the products they grew they also ate river fish and turtles. The discoveries explain why areas of forest surrounding archaeological sites tend to feature more edible plants than average.

Dr Yoshi Maezumi led the team. He says that ancient humans found a way to create a nutrient rich soil called Amazonian Dark Earths by farming in much more sustainable way, a way that continually enriched the soil rather than contstantly depleting it. The amazing soil they created let the people grow nutrient-hungry crops like maize in more places, even in regions the soil was very poor. And that in turn fed a growing Amazon population.

There really is a better way to grow crops

The ancient farming method involved clearing some low trees and weeds while keeping the closed canopy above. It's dramatically different from today's brutal methods, which simply involve clearing more and more land for industrial scale grain, soya bean, and cattle production. It reveals there really is a better way, a more efficient way to farm without destroying precious forests.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - August 2, 2018 at 7:10 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

Great news – The world’s newest and biggest protected rainforest

We don't often get good news. Our world is usually populated with stories about deforestation and disaster. So it's lovely to be able to talk about an incredibly important milestone for the Amazon itself and for rainforest conservatoin everywhere.

A region of outstanding universal value

The Serrania del Chiribiquete, in Colombia, has been declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, who have recognised its outstanding universal value to nature and people. Now it's the world’s biggest tropical rainforest national park, a huge effort that has taken decades of hard work by environmentalists and conservationists to bring to fruition.

The protected area is home to an impressive 3000 or more types of animals and plants, and is now twice as large as it originally was. In a world where 33% of so-called protected areas remain threatened by human activities, it's a vital development.

Chiribiquete is incredibly remote. There have been many years of armed conflict in the area, which has made life tricky for scientists and conservationists. The sheer, remarkable biodiversity of the regon is down to its location, a magical place where four very different geographic regions – the Amazon, Andean, Orinoco and Guyanas – meet. All this makes the news a defining moment in the good fight.

A big step in the right direction

Chiribiquete is not only a biological, cultural, hydrological and archaeological treasure. It's also vitally important to the indigenous people – some still uncontacted – who live in the area. Colombia’s forests, like all rainforests, remain threatened by deforestation to make way for agriculture, industry and settlement, and climate change continues apace, but the news represents a considerable positive step in the right direction.

The new park includes areas with very highest deforestation rates, so it's hopeful that the news will help stop the timber and illegal crop trade in its tracks. It's wonderful to see the Colombian government taking such an important step towards protecting the region, against a landscape where, all too often, government inaction, corruption and short-term thinking are at the forefront of the destruction.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - July 4, 2018 at 6:13 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

Water Stewardship: Concepts for a More Sustainable Future

Water matters. Not just to the broader economy, but also to companies whose products and services impact our global economy and climate. Water issues are now taking a far greater and more prominent position in the global economy.

As growing pressure emerges on our planet’s most precious resource, businesses have turned their attention and focus on the importance of water stewardship. Smarter business means understanding the risks posed by water scarcity and pollution. Taking action requires businesses to adopt more sustainable practices.

Encouraging good water stewardship means incorporating sustainable water management if businesses are to continue operating, and for people to keep on living. Here are three approaches to corporate water stewardship.

1. Understanding the importance of a changing water world

When examining the role of companies in the context of water stewardship, consider these trends as highlighted by World Wildlife Fund:

  • In the next 40 years, the human population will exponentially increase by 2.5 billion. This will increase humanity’s water footprint, increasing costs for infrastructure.
  • Rising incomes will result in changes in consumption patterns. Higher consumption of food and other resources will require collective action to ensure there is enough food and resources to meet demand.
  • Global climate change will have a greater impact on weather variability. Snow and ice will carry less freshwater storage, more extreme events will lead to changes in ecosystems. These will have undeniable effects on water management practices, particularly in environments that support life and livelihoods dependent on freshwater.

Already, it is estimated that 4 billion people worldwide face economic water shortage, leading to inadequate sanitation. A lack of access to clean, potable water has resulted in many being exposed to water-borne diseases such as cholera, typhoid, and diarrhoea, among other water-related illnesses.

The global nature of our changing water world means coordinated action is required across governments, sectors of society, and enterprises to ensure water security for all, and sustainable water resources and infrastructure.

2. Business engagement with water management

The implications of freshwater supply challenges, from societal, environmental, and investment perspectives, means water stewardship should be a top priority. Current water issues, both regionally and locally, mean businesses will soon face, if they have not already done so, serious water problems. Water risks for companies will have strategic and profound impacts on brand value and its profitability.

Business engagement must go beyond corporate social responsibility (CSR). Achieving accessible and sustainable flows to clean, potable water is a core business issue that is strategic to long-term opportunities for growth and profit. As water is material from a production standpoint, businesses must highlight the importance of good water stewardship to c-suite executives, shareholders, and investors.

The highly varied possibilities of water scarcity-related risks mean businesses must provide an exhaustive evaluation of water-related risks and corporate water usage performance. This can provide interpretive guidance for companies to actively manage water risks.

3. The role of leadership in water stewardship

Becoming a proven global leader of good water stewardship is critical from a business perspective in addressing pressing problems surrounding water management and sustainability. The evolving role of business in a global economy has impacted how society is incentivized to engage in water sustainability practices. Indeed, establishing good water stewardship and environmental responsibility must be demonstrated from a leadership position.

While a significant amount of work has already resulted in many technological and scientific breakthroughs in addressing sustainable water stewardship, business leaders must build on this work and demonstrate sustainable water management to bring substantial, long-term and all-encompassing change.

A collaborative approach, focusing on cross-sector and cross-industry involvement will be key in tackling sustainable challenges in the years to come. Addressing further issues surrounding sustainable water stewardship must come from an authoritative standpoint. Initiatives that discuss innovative solutions to water management must be proposed and discussed among senior policy-makers and business leaders.

The enormous influence of those in leadership positions is critical in starting a dialogue that will translate into meaningful and widespread collective action.

A call to action

The stewardship role goes beyond those within the private sector. Using agents to create a local-to-global approach will be critical in advancing the dialogue on how the global society addresses freshwater shortage issues and meets general water-related challenges.

Only engagement through collective effort will lead to better, more efficient and sustainable water resource management for the benefit and survival of everyone.


AUTHOR BIO

Patrick Randall is the Vice President of National Sales at Hepure Technologies. He holds a BS in Mechanical and Chemical Engineering from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and an M.S. in Civil Engineering from CSUS. He has been working in the environmental and bioremediation space since graduating in 1986.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - May 22, 2018 at 6:11 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

The Mountain Apple – An Invader’s Impact 100 years on

In about 1917 someone brought a small, fast-growing tree called Bellucia pentamera from South America and planted it in Indonesia’s gorgeous Bogor Botanical Gardens. Called the mountain apple, its fruits were used by some indigenous people in the Amazon to help with parasite infections.

Now, just over a century later, the mountain apple is flourishing across Asia, mostly thanks to its small seeds which are widely transported by birds and bats. And it is a familiar face on Borneo's Gunung Palung National Park, home to some of the last big areas of lowland rainforest in Southeast Asia and an area rich in seven different types of rainforest.

The mountain apple loves deforestation

Intense logging between 2000 and 2002 helped the invader spread, taking out most of the biggest, most valuable trees and leaving huge gaps in the canopy, which in turn heated the forest floor and ruined the essential shade beneath. But one resident really doesn't mind these new conditions. In fact the mountain apple withstands the hot sun, so much so that it actually out-competes native light-loving species.

PhD student Christopher Dillis of the University of California and his team compared the fruiting frequency of Bellucia to native trees. They found that, on average, 56% of Bellucia in Gunung Palung National Park produced fruit every month, against just 4% of native rainforest trees.

Why does Bellucia love logging?

Canopy gaps are not uncommon. So why is Bellucia more attracted to logged areas than natural canopy gaps? Bellucia trees in gaps created by logging produced more fruits than Bellucia growing in natural canopy gaps, and nobody really knows why. It might be that the intense light in logging gaps lets the trees grow particularly big leaves, which mean more photosynthesis and more energy, which gives it a competitive advantage.

We already know that plant diversity is vital for the health of rainforests, and every other kind of forest. Logging in Gunung Palung has decreased but still continues. Large-scale oil palm agriculture doesn't help. Thankfully, unlike some invaders, Bellucia doesn't run rampant through pristine jungle. It needs logging gaps. But it just goes to show how very damaging even the least dodgy invaders can be if left to its own devices.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - May 10, 2018 at 7:02 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

81 ancient settlements discovered in Mato Grosso

You can't see a thing from ground level. But take a bunch of satellite images and the mostly-unexplored Brazilian state of Mato Grosso turns out to be unexpectedly densely populated, with 81 seven hundred year old pre-Columbian settlements clearly visible. More interesting still, they weren't near large rivers but built near smaller streams, smashing the theory that the pre-Columbians lived on fertile flood plains and left most of the dense surrounding forest uninhabited.

A million people or more once lived in Mato Grosso

There's more. When the researchers’ fired up their computer model to find out how many people are likely to have lived in the region in pre-Colombian times and the answer was an extraordinary ‘up to a million people'. And that's many, many more than anyone has predicted before. And it suggests the Amazon was not sparsely populated and pristine back then after all. It was a hub of human activity.

Home to a powerful pre-European civilisation

All 81 settlements pre-date the arrival of Europeans and all consisted of fortified ceremonial villages and earthworks laid out either in squares, circulars or hexagons. 24 of the sites were also double-checked from the ground and proved  representative of the region. The team found bits of pottery, polished stone axes and charcoal-rich soil, all revealing long-term human habitation and dating back to 1410 – 1460 AD.

The Amazon was buzzing with human activity

It looks like human populations in these regions were actually quite large. The research hints that similar settlements might turn up over a vast area of the southern Amazon measuring 154,000 square miles, which may have supported anything from half a million to a million people, which in turn means previous estimates of the population of the Amazon in pre-Colombian times were probably way too low. On the other hand the region is so vast that it can easily swallow up a couple of million people without a trace, so the population wasn't exactly dense by modern standards.

Most of the Amazon hasn’t been excavated yet, so it'll be fascinating to see what else is uncovered by archaeologists.

1 comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - April 5, 2018 at 9:33 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

Beautiful Clothing With a Serious Conservation Message

The fashion industry isn't known for its conservation-mindedness. In fact it's better known for its profligacy, the toxicity of its manufacturing methods and vast amounts of polluting waste. On the bright side the Fashion for Conservation organisation is dedicated to making a wholly positive impact on our world via conservation-inspired couture. And their latest venture will prove positive for rainforest conservation.

The organisation's three founders Nazanine Afshar, Dr. Samantha Zwicker and Ava Holmes have showcased  another couple of magical collections of haute couture designed to educate people about animals and the ecosystems they depend on, at the same time donating funds to relevant wildlife groups.

Zero waste haute couture rich in upcycled and unwanted materials

London Fashion Week saw the collections, both inspired by the Amazonian rainforest, on display.  Each collection is completely ‘zero waste' and includes end-of-roll textiles from interior designers as well as upcycled cloth from donated clothes.

Rainforest Runway

The Kent-based designer Kalikas Armour kicked off the catwalk show, aptly named the ‘Rainforest Runway', with a collection of masterpieces inspired by the indigenous tribes whose rainforest homelands are steadily being destroyed. His work uses ethically made fabrics from Europe and consists of a series of shimmering black and gold one-offs, lush evening wear including shimmering dresses, elegant opera coats and sequinned suits.

Magpies & Peacocks

The Houston-based designer René Garza is the creator of the second collection, made for the Magpies & Peacocks non-profit design house. Offcuts of fabric, bolt-ends, unwanted tablecloths and clothing was used to make a series of wonderful draped dresses of various lengths.

The money made from selling drinks and raffle tickets at the Fashion for Conservation show goes to help fund Hoja Nueva (link to http://hojanueva.org/), a respected Peruvian non-profit organisation dedicated to education, conservation, research and sustainable human development.

Against a continuing backdrop of waste and pollution, it's great to see one tiny corner of the world's second most wasteful and polluting industries starting to take rainforest conservation seriously.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - March 6, 2018 at 8:09 am

Categories: Conservation, Eco Clothing   Tags:

How philanthropy created Chile’s new 10 million acre National Park

As reported by National Geographic magazine, Chile's government has delivered on its promise to add more land to the stunning wilderness of Patagonia Park, one of the nation's newest national parks, in conjunction with conservationist Kristine Tomkins.

Patagonia Park is already a haven for extraordinary wildlife, including the extremely rare and critically endangered  huemul, a kind of deer, plus astonishing birds like the condor and Darwin’s rhea. The announcement should help conserve these wonders for the future.

Congratulations to Chile's President, thanks to the Tompkins'

The Chilean president Michelle Bachelet has declared a major expansion of his country's national parklands, creating two brand new parks and protecting enormous chunks of rainforest, grassland and other types of unique wilderness for future generations.

This is an extraordinary move in a world where short termism and greed so often win out over conservation-minded long term thinking. In Bachelet's words, “With these beautiful lands, their forests, their rich ecosystems, we… expand the network of parks to more than 10 million acres, thus, national parks in Chile will increase by 38.5% to account for 81.1% of Chile’s protected areas.”

The announcement is music to the ears of conservationists, for whom news this good is a rarity. It's an incredible achievement for the conservation movement worldwide and proves that where there's a will, there's a way.

Music to the ears of conservationists

This is probably the world’s biggest ever donation of private land, thanks to two US  philanthropist Kristine Tompkins and her late husband Doug, who together ran the highly respected Tompkins Conservation organisation.

Kristine has gifted the Chilean government just over a million acres of land, which the couple bought and protected over the decades,  and the Chilean government has contributed nearly nine million acres of federally owned land. The result is a huge protected area roughly the size of Switzerland, a place rich in huge snow-capped mountains, vast canyons, fjords, white water rivers and enormous coastal volcanoes.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - February 8, 2018 at 8:49 am

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

Aussie rainforest damage goes unpunished

Australia's Environment Protection Agency has come under fire because damage to an important rainforest has gone unpunished. The nation's environmental watchdog claimed it didn't have enough evidence to prosecute the state-owned Forestry Corporation NSW, who are thought to have done the damage, and the failure has been damned as ‘totally preposterous' by the eco-activist who identified the many breaches committed by the Corporation.

Apparently the EPA had a full two years in which to investigate and take legal action for damage caused in the beautiful, ancient Cherry Tree State Forest. But the organisation waited until two weeks before the deadline ran out to tell the spokesman for the North East Forest Alliance, Dailan Pugh, that the origin of the damage couldn't be proved ‘beyond reasonable doubt'.

FC NSW in hot water

The Forestry Corporation NSW has allegedly harvested and bulldozed numerous roads through the precious  lowland rainforest, which is seriously endangered. But Mr Pugh first alerted authorities to potentially thousands of instances of damage to protected trees during 2015. And Forestry Corp have completely refused to admit it was responsible for the damage. The EPA is trying to claim someone else damaged the forest, something Mr Pugh said was ‘preposterous'. In his opinion the Agency has long had more than enough circumstantial evidence to prosecute.

Proof of who did the dirty deed

The other problem is the difficulty of proving whether the cleared trees were virgin forest or regrowth from previous harvests. While Jackie Miles from the EPA's forestry division told Mr Pugh they had, “conducted a thorough and rigorous investigation“, they concluded there wasn't enough evidence to prove the damage wasn't caused buy someone else. Mr Pugh responded that both the EPA and the Forestry Corporation should have been aware of protected rainforest in the region since its principal area was mapped as such in the 1960s and has been re-mapped repeatedly since then. He feels there's absolutely no doubt who is to blame.

Greed trumps the environment yet again

Is this another instance of greed and profit trumping environmental protection? Dawn Walker, spokesperson for the NSW Greens, says there's “no clearer example of how the current system is failing,” with “one government agency, Forestry Corp, wantonly damaging the environment, while the EPA turns a blind eye”. There are currently more investigations going on to pin down the blame for similar damage in Australia's Gladstone, Giberagee and Sugarloaf forests.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by Eco Warrior - December 4, 2017 at 4:35 pm

Categories: Conservation   Tags:

Next Page »

Pin It on Pinterest