Conservation

How philanthropy created Chile’s new 10 million acre National Park

As reported by National Geographic magazine, Chile's government has delivered on its promise to add more land to the stunning wilderness of Patagonia Park, one of the nation's newest national parks, in conjunction with conservationist Kristine Tomkins.

Patagonia Park is already a haven for extraordinary wildlife, including the extremely rare and critically endangered  huemul, a kind of deer, plus astonishing birds like the condor and Darwin’s rhea. The announcement should help conserve these wonders for the future.

Congratulations to Chile's President, thanks to the Tompkins'

The Chilean president Michelle Bachelet has declared a major expansion of his country's national parklands, creating two brand new parks and protecting enormous chunks of rainforest, grassland and other types of unique wilderness for future generations.

This is an extraordinary move in a world where short termism and greed so often win out over conservation-minded long term thinking. In Bachelet's words, “With these beautiful lands, their forests, their rich ecosystems, we… expand the network of parks to more than 10 million acres, thus, national parks in Chile will increase by 38.5% to account for 81.1% of Chile’s protected areas.”

The announcement is music to the ears of conservationists, for whom news this good is a rarity. It's an incredible achievement for the conservation movement worldwide and proves that where there's a will, there's a way.

Music to the ears of conservationists

This is probably the world’s biggest ever donation of private land, thanks to two US  philanthropist Kristine Tompkins and her late husband Doug, who together ran the highly respected Tompkins Conservation organisation.

Kristine has gifted the Chilean government just over a million acres of land, which the couple bought and protected over the decades,  and the Chilean government has contributed nearly nine million acres of federally owned land. The result is a huge protected area roughly the size of Switzerland, a place rich in huge snow-capped mountains, vast canyons, fjords, white water rivers and enormous coastal volcanoes.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - February 8, 2018 at 8:49 am

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Aussie rainforest damage goes unpunished

Australia's Environment Protection Agency has come under fire because damage to an important rainforest has gone unpunished. The nation's environmental watchdog claimed it didn't have enough evidence to prosecute the state-owned Forestry Corporation NSW, who are thought to have done the damage, and the failure has been damned as ‘totally preposterous' by the eco-activist who identified the many breaches committed by the Corporation.

Apparently the EPA had a full two years in which to investigate and take legal action for damage caused in the beautiful, ancient Cherry Tree State Forest. But the organisation waited until two weeks before the deadline ran out to tell the spokesman for the North East Forest Alliance, Dailan Pugh, that the origin of the damage couldn't be proved ‘beyond reasonable doubt'.

FC NSW in hot water

The Forestry Corporation NSW has allegedly harvested and bulldozed numerous roads through the precious  lowland rainforest, which is seriously endangered. But Mr Pugh first alerted authorities to potentially thousands of instances of damage to protected trees during 2015. And Forestry Corp have completely refused to admit it was responsible for the damage. The EPA is trying to claim someone else damaged the forest, something Mr Pugh said was ‘preposterous'. In his opinion the Agency has long had more than enough circumstantial evidence to prosecute.

Proof of who did the dirty deed

The other problem is the difficulty of proving whether the cleared trees were virgin forest or regrowth from previous harvests. While Jackie Miles from the EPA's forestry division told Mr Pugh they had, “conducted a thorough and rigorous investigation“, they concluded there wasn't enough evidence to prove the damage wasn't caused buy someone else. Mr Pugh responded that both the EPA and the Forestry Corporation should have been aware of protected rainforest in the region since its principal area was mapped as such in the 1960s and has been re-mapped repeatedly since then. He feels there's absolutely no doubt who is to blame.

Greed trumps the environment yet again

Is this another instance of greed and profit trumping environmental protection? Dawn Walker, spokesperson for the NSW Greens, says there's “no clearer example of how the current system is failing,” with “one government agency, Forestry Corp, wantonly damaging the environment, while the EPA turns a blind eye”. There are currently more investigations going on to pin down the blame for similar damage in Australia's Gladstone, Giberagee and Sugarloaf forests.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - December 4, 2017 at 4:35 pm

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About the biggest reforestation project… ever

Climate change is happening, and it's happening fast. In a race to tackle sky-rocketing CO2 emissions the non-profit organisation Conservation International is setting up the biggest tropical reforestation initiative ever seen, with plans to plant an awesome 73 million trees in Brazil over a 6 year period. If deforestation stopped altogether, the world's forests could absorb as much as 37% of our annual carbon emissions all on their own. That's unlikely, but this project takes a considerable step in the right direction.

Mending the arc of deforestation

The region in question is called the ‘arc of deforestation', a massive area extending to 70,000 acres that has been cleared for pasture. The intention is to return it to lush rainforest. It's vital since some scientists predict 20% more of the Amazon rainforest might be deforested over the next two decades despite the fact that doing so will push climate change along even further. And tropical trees are our best bet. As the CEO of Conservation International, M. Sanjayan, says, “it's not just the trees that matter, but what kind of trees. If you’re really thinking about getting carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, then tropical forests are the ones that end up mattering the most.”

An innovative, more efficient and cheaper way of reforesting

To maximise the impact of the reforestation project, Conservation International has pinned down a new, very efficient planting technique called muvuca, where literally hundreds of native tree seeds from multiple species are planted, covering every inch of deforested land. The seeds will come from the Xingu Seed Network, a native seed supplier for a host of conservation organisations. They have a dedicated network of over 400 seed collectors, usually indigenous women and youths.

Much better seed survival and plant density

Once the seeds grow, nature decides which of the new plants survives. It looks like an impressive 90% of native plants germinated survive using this method, which is also cheaper and less labour-intensive than the traditional way of planting actual saplings. A density of about 160 plants per hectare isn't unusual for traditional reforestation methods compared to 2,500 species per hectare for the new method, and a decade later we could easily see 5,000 new trees per hectare.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - November 7, 2017 at 2:37 pm

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Australia’s Rainforest Foundation is in Big Trouble

As reported in the Cairns Post newspaper, so far Rainforest Trust Australia has bought more than three million acres of rainforest spread across the nation's famously beautiful and unique Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. It has cost them millions of Australian dollars. But now they're being investigated by the authorities for allegedly ‘misappropriating' money they were given as grants.

About the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area

The Wet Tropics World Heritage Area sits between Townsville and Cooktown on the north-east coast of Queensland. It covers a vast area of almost nine thousand square kilometers, 450 km long and consisting largely of lush tropical rainforests. Many plant and animal species in the Wet Tropics are unique,  found nowhere else in the world.

A grant that wasn't spent on weed control

Apparently the Commonwealth grant in question was for $775,500, a sum that was handed over in 2014 to pay for weed control at a chunk of land near El Arish, at the Mission Beach cassowary corridor. It looks like the promised weed control hasn't been done, a delay that contravenes the grant's guidelines. Local people have a similar complaint – that the land bought by the foundation is in worse condition now than it was when they bought it. Far from there being fewer weeds, there are actually more, and there has even been some re-vegetation.

The case now rests with the Commonwealth DPP

The investigation was recently confirmed by Australia's Federal Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg, who is keen to look into a  government grant awarded to the organisation, which was previously called Rainforest Trust Australia. Now the case has been sent to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions, who will be considering what direction to take the investigation in next.

RTA defends itself

In the charity's defence, Rainforest Trust Australia chairman David Butler said there wasn't a case to answer because an ex-employee, who was responsible for the fraudulent behaviour, has already been charged by the Department of Public Prosecutions and no longer works for the organisation. Furthermore, because the matter is still being dealt with by the court, it's sub judicae and the charity can't comment further. He also said that since the enquiry started they've been busy putting in place better processes and procedures as regards governance and financial management, so this kind of thing can't happen again.


Guest post by The Rainforest Foundation.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - October 3, 2017 at 1:54 pm

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Two Year Study Reveals Almost 400 New Amazon Rainforest Species

Experts estimate that our planet is home to around 8.7 million species, more than 80% of which haven't yet been identified. The Amazon is the world's largest area of tropical rainforest, and it's home to the biggest collection of plants and animals. Now we've found 400 more new species there.

A place rich in magical new flora and fauna

We all know that rainforests are absolutely stuffed with magical flora and fauna, many of which are yet to be discovered. But nobody predicted that a two year study would deliver almost four hundred new species in the Amazon rainforest alone, hinting that the remarkable richness and diversity of the world's forests are probably even greater than anyone imagined.

The study, which ran between 2014 and 2015, revealed 381 new species in the Amazon region, according to a report by the World Wildlife Fund and Mamiraua Institute for Sustainable Development. Apparently the researchers tracked down a new species every two days or so, finding in total 216 new plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals, 19 reptiles and one bird, all previously unknown. The discoveries were made across all nine countries covered by the Amazon's tropical forest.

At more risk than ever from human activity

It's amazing news. But the flip side is that these new species could so easily be lost forever, at constant risk from mining, logging, road building and climate change. All the new species were found in areas of the forest that are already at risk from human activity, and the sheer, unprecedented level of habitat change we're seeing right now means many species may go extinct before we discover their existence. That's terribly sad.

2000 new species found over three periods of research

The report is the third of its kind. The three research projects together discovered 2000 or so new species in the past 17 years.  The report's authors are determined to continue research in the area to monitor and preserve biodiversity because the sheer wealth of biodiversity found there is unique and unparalleled.

Let's hope their work plays a part in protecting this absolute treasure of an environment.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - September 8, 2017 at 6:12 am

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Celebrating Nature: The Species that are Bouncing Back

‘There aren't enough good news stories in the world of environmentalism, which is why it's important to share them when they come along, because they show that we can make a difference and that things can get better.

This story celebrates the bouncing back of several animal species, which have been at risk of extinction, nit which are now starting to flourish, thanks to the fantastic work of conservationists around the globe.

You can find out more about the animals that are being brought back from the brink of extinction, which include the Arabian Oryx, the Giant Panda and the Stellar Sea Lion.

Click here for the full story

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Posted by Eco Warrior - August 14, 2017 at 1:39 pm

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The Body Shop’s brilliant Bio-Bridges scheme

The British cosmetics company Body Shop was founded in Brighton, Sussex, in 1976 by Dame Anita Roddick, now deceased. Her good work carries on thanks to their collaboration with conservation schemes in Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia, designed to lend a helping hand to endangered species like orang-utans, tigers and monkeys.

The company has already worked closely with the World Land Trust on several bio-bridges. Now they've announced a new initiative to create ten new bridges to link areas of rainforest so animals can travel between pristine areas of forest safely.

Special corridors to link isolated animal and plant populations

These special corridors are designed to link wildlife hotspots together by the year 2020, connecting otherwise isolated and endangered flora and fauna so they can breed and thrive. The Body Shop is already committed to protect 75 million square metres of habitat within the same timescale, impressive stuff.

Bringing in local people and helping them live sustainably

A vital element of the Body Shop's World Bio-Bridges Mission involves engaging local people in protecting their rainforest habitats, at the same time supporting them in developing more sustainable ways of living. The organisation will also be scouring the rainforests for new natural ingredients to be used in their products, which represent sustainable sources of income for local people to replace logging and poaching. The Body Shop plans to raise funds and awareness by selling a range of different special edition products.

What the Body Shop says

As Christopher Davis, the retailer's international director of corporate responsibility and campaigns said, “Through protecting and regenerating land, working with local communities and seeking partnerships with civil and state organisation around the world, the World Bio-Bridges Mission can make a substantial difference to some of the planet's richest and most diverse areas.”

Why don't more household brands join in?

It's great to see Dame Roddick's dedication to conservation continuing, and really good news to hear about these initiatives, which bring the consumer world and conservations world together in the interest of the common good of humanity and our fellow creatures. It's a shame more large, influential companies don't do the same.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - July 5, 2017 at 3:10 pm

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About Malaysia’s first ever Rainforest Fringe Festival

It's a great way to raise awareness and bring the plight of Malaysia's rainforests to the attention of more people. The first ever Rainforest Fringe Festival takes place in Kuching, Sarawak in July, a ten day extravaganza of art and craft, music, exhibitions, fashion, performance and more. It's on from 7th July and is the precursor to the Rainforest World Music Festival, an extremely popular two day day event held at the Sarawak Cultural Village, celebrating its 20th birthday this year.

The festival is designed to support the Rainforest World Music Festival, and has an interesting remit: to educate and inspire local people, giving them an understanding of the “huge treasure trove” that the region's forests offer, and about the funds that have been set aside for the development of arts and culture in the region.

The rich heritage of Sarawak will be portrayed by a concert featuring local talent: the pop singers Dayang Nurfaizah and Pete Kallang, the Indie musician Noh Salleh, the actor-singer Tony Eusoff, and the highly respected sape player and artist Mathew Ngau. There will be plenty of art exhibitions, including paintings, sculpture, installations and photography, providing a fascinating insight into the region's people and traditions.

Some of the major highlights of the ten day festival

  • Sarawak photographer K.F Wong’s 1940s-50s photos of the many ancient tribes in Sarawak, including the Dayak people
  • Photojournalist Jimmy Nelson’s images of indigenous communities
  • Photographer and botanist Ch’ien Lee’s stunning wildlife and nature photography
  • Sarawakian artist Kendy Mitot combines the traditional arts and culture with innovative mixed media works
  • Alena Murang, the musician, dancer and artist looks back at into the past at the nature and people of Borneo
  • Spencer Byles presents an outdoor exhibition of natural sculptures, using the rainforest as his canvas
  • A craft and vintage market selling vintage and contemporary artisan items
  • Daily film screenings
  • A colourful fashion show
  • Fascinating talks about British explorers and naturalists Charles Hose and Alfred Wallace

If you are fortunate enough to be in the area when the festival kicks off you are in for a treat. The Rainforest Fringe Festival takes place in the Old Court House, Kuching Amphitheatre, Waterfront Hotel and Culture Club. It has been organised thanks to a collaboration by Joe Sidek Productions, the local Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture, Youth and Sport, Sarawak Tourism, and the Rainforest World Music Festival.


To help protect some of the worlds most vulnerable rainforest, please consider making a donation to the Rainforest Foundation.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - June 7, 2017 at 5:07 pm

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The Global Species Crisis: Mammals on the Brink of Extinction

For some animal species, time on planet Earth is running out. There have been five mass extinctions in the planet’s history, and animal populations so far suggest that we may have entered what will be the sixth great extinction wave. Since the 1960’s and 1970’s, when the idea of saving many of the world’s animals was first recognised, scientists have strived to save dwindling animal numbers. But, despite efforts, the list of endangered species has more than doubled in the past two decades according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). More than 23,000 plant and animal species are listed on the IUCN, including corals, birds, mammals and amphibians.

What classes an animal as endangered?

The IUCN accounts for all of the endangered species, classifying them on a spectrum that ranges from “near threatened” to “extinct”; with “endangered” species in the middle. Factors that are examined to determine the level of extinction include a vulnerability analysis of a species’ habitat, an indication of a shrinking population, and observing issues that prevent reproduction.

As it stands, 3,406 mammal species are categorised as threatened. In 2015 the number stood at 1,201. Extinction rates have reached levels unparalleled since the dinosaurs died out 66 million years ago, and this is mainly because of air and water pollution, forest clearing, loss of wetlands, and other man-induced environmental changes. As human beings, we are responsible for being the biggest threat to endangered species. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to wildlife globally, affecting over 2,000 mammals.

How losing species could create a butterfly effect.

Species loss threatens to reduce biodiversity and ultimately the collapse of ecosystems across the world. One of the biggest examples of this are endangered bees. The rusty patched bumblebee’s population has plummeted nearly 90% since the 1990’s in the United States. Bees play a vital role in pollination for agriculture, globally honey bees are the world's most important pollinator of food crops. It is estimated that one-third of the food that we consume each day relies on pollination mainly by bees.

The Countries with the most threatened mammal species.

For World Environment Day on 5th June, Eco2Greetings have used World Bank data to highlight where in the world mammals are most in need of protection and conservation. The map reveals the top 10 countries with the most threatened mammals.

The number of mammals in Eco2Greeting’s top 10 list who are on the brink of extinction is 898, and they are struggling to survive in all corners of the world; from Australia and Malaysia to Mexico and Brazil. Indonesia is the country taking the top spot of the most threatened mammal list. A gargantuan 188 species of mammal are classified as endangered here and will be wiped out completely if more is not done to conserve them in their corner of the world. Madagascar, home to the favourable Lemur is next with 120 of their national mammal species under threat.

Find the full interactive map here.

 

Global Species Crisis

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Posted by Eco Warrior - June 2, 2017 at 6:45 am

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Chaotic Brazilian Politics threatens Amazon rainforest conservation

The Amazon rainforest already faces devastation thanks to climate change and deforestation. Now politics is set to make things a whole lot worse thanks to the Brazilian former President, Dilma Rousseff, being impeached.

How come? It looks like a subset of the National Congress of Brazil, which represents agribusinesses and big landowners, is using the political uncertainty to force through legislation designed to reverse various legal protections that have kept the forest relatively safe until now.

Greed sits at the heart of the initiative

This greedy group is keen to make more cash from the rainforest, and wants to open up former conservation areas to mining and agriculture in a horribly short-sighted initiative. Michel Temer, the ex-President's successor, isn't helping matters. He has decided to fast-track a handful of huge infrastructure development projects that require large-scale deforestation, including the hotly contested Cuiaba-Santarem road, set to cut the Amazon in half with devastating results. At the same time the Brazilian Ministry of Environment's budget has just been cut by more than 40% and science budgets have plummeted by 44%, mirroring a post-truth cut in similar budgets in other countries.

All this means Brazil’s long standing environmental licensing process could be under threat, with environmental law enforcement at an all-time low. Constitutional amendment 65 is the culprit, a piece of legislation that will force government agencies to agree all proposed infrastructure projects no matter how seriously they affect the forest. All that's needed is a three-fifths majority vote and amendment 65 will become law.

Goodbye to hard-won rainforest stability in the region

It's terrible news since the Brazilian Amazon had been relatively stable for a decade or so until three years ago, when we saw a sudden and dramatic hike in new deforestation. 2016 saw a rise of just under 30% compared to 2015, something that conservationists are laying at the feet of global price hikes on soya beans and beef, both frequently grown on deforested land.

Indigenous landowners to the rescue

The best hope of positive action comes from the forests' indigenous people, who have enjoyed considerable success protecting their own land. In these areas deforestation is just 10% of that in non-indigenous owned areas.  Around 3000 indigenous people are about to join an encampment in Brasilia to protest about the cuts in funding.  As one commentator said in New Scientist magazine, (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2129024-amazon-rainforest-under-threat-as-brazil-tears-up-protections/) “Indigenous people across the country are outraged at the failure to safeguard their land, without which they cannot survive.”

Add your voice to the protest

Can you help by protesting direct to the Brazilian government? Yes, you can. All you need to do is click here to see how you can help.

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Posted by Eco Warrior - May 5, 2017 at 7:38 am

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