Beautiful Clothing With a Serious Conservation Message

Fashion for Conservation

The fashion industry isn't known for its conservation-mindedness. In fact it's better known for its profligacy, the toxicity of its manufacturing methods and vast amounts of polluting waste. On the bright side the Fashion for Conservation organisation is dedicated to making a wholly positive impact on our world via conservation-inspired couture. And their latest venture will prove positive for rainforest conservation.

The organisation's three founders Nazanine Afshar, Dr. Samantha Zwicker and Ava Holmes have showcased  another couple of magical collections of haute couture designed to educate people about animals and the ecosystems they depend on, at the same time donating funds to relevant wildlife groups.

Zero waste haute couture rich in upcycled and unwanted materials

London Fashion Week saw the collections, both inspired by the Amazonian rainforest, on display.  Each collection is completely ‘zero waste' and includes end-of-roll textiles from interior designers as well as upcycled cloth from donated clothes.

Rainforest Runway

The Kent-based designer Kalikas Armour kicked off the catwalk show, aptly named the ‘Rainforest Runway', with a collection of masterpieces inspired by the indigenous tribes whose rainforest homelands are steadily being destroyed. His work uses ethically made fabrics from Europe and consists of a series of shimmering black and gold one-offs, lush evening wear including shimmering dresses, elegant opera coats and sequinned suits.

Magpies & Peacocks

The Houston-based designer René Garza is the creator of the second collection, made for the Magpies & Peacocks non-profit design house. Offcuts of fabric, bolt-ends, unwanted tablecloths and clothing was used to make a series of wonderful draped dresses of various lengths.

The money made from selling drinks and raffle tickets at the Fashion for Conservation show goes to help fund Hoja Nueva (link to http://hojanueva.org/), a respected Peruvian non-profit organisation dedicated to education, conservation, research and sustainable human development.

Against a continuing backdrop of waste and pollution, it's great to see one tiny corner of the world's second most wasteful and polluting industries starting to take rainforest conservation seriously.

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