4 Basics of Conserving Water at Home

4 Basics of Conserving Water at Home

The dwindling drinking water is turning into a global problem, as opposed to something notoriously only happening somewhere in Africa. We can’t expect to start being mindful with water use as a species – the change in mentality comes from an individual, who contributes little, yet serves as a great example. Conserving water doesn’t mean being paranoid about the water problem, it means being reasonable enough to know how to limit the excessive water usage.

Seeing as how smart water use starts at your very own doorstep, here are some great ways to conserve water at home.

Learn when to turn it off

Learn when to turn it off

Quite honestly, this shouldn’t even be a thing of debate; turning the faucet off when you’re not using it seems pretty obvious, when you think about it. Unfortunately, we are creatures of habit – the decades of ignorance have led us to take water for granted. However, even if all the world’s drinking water was for us to take (which it isn’t), there simply won’t be enough of it around for us to exploit, before long.

On a more down-to-earth note, here’s what we’re talking about here: turning the faucet/shower off when it’s not in use. For example, there is virtually no reason to keep the faucet running while brushing your teeth – this can take as much as five minutes, which is a whole lot of water spent for no particular reason. The same goes for showers: turning the faucet off while applying soap and scrubbing can save gallons per session!

We could list all kinds of examples that range from washing the dishes, to watering your lawn, but most of us are well-aware of our spending; we’re just too stubborn to change. Well, change! Our planet deserves it.

Install low-flow faucets and showerheads

Install low-flow faucets and showerheads

It may not seem like a big deal, but a low-flow faucet in the kitchen can cut your water spending, let alone a low-flow showerhead! Sure, these do tend to be more expensive than your regular faucets and showerheads, but consider what limiting the water flow entails; yep, less water spent means a curbed water bill!

Jumping from the comfort of a high-pressure to a limited water flow may feel uncomfortable in the beginning, but you won’t even notice it after a while, especially when it comes to faucets.

Check for leaks

Check for leaks

If your kitchen or bathroom floor is wet frequently, chances are that you have a leak somewhere that can account for that nasty wet sock feeling, but more importantly, for water wasting. Check all of your appliances, from the shower to the bidet and try limiting yourself to as few of these as possible. For example, there is no need to install an actual bidet – for instance, a reputable Australian bidet company offers bidets as toilet attachments, which are very convenient, spend less water than an actual bidet and save you the trouble and the space.

Low-flow toilets are vital

Your regular toilet might not seem like a water guzzler, but make no mistake about it – on average, the toilet accounts for 28% of water use per home, or as much as 7 gallons per flush! This is a huge deal, and it should not go unchecked, especially owing to the fact that low-flow toilets can be flushed two times and still save you a gallon or two. Even if you don’t care enough about our planet’s underlying water problem, you’ll still end up saving money in the long run!

Conserving water starts at your very own doorstep. There’s a whole lot you can do that can serve the purpose of helping our planet and your pocket, simultaneously! Be conscious about keeping those faucets and showers running when not necessary and opt for low-flow kitchen and bathroom appliances. Oh, and be sure to check for leaks; where there’s a puddle, there’s wasted water.

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